Paperweight with Socrates

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Silverware and silver sculptures

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Liste nozze

Paperweight with Socrates

Categoria:

Silverware and silver sculptures

Sottocategoria:

Desk Paperwight

Marchio:

Serra - Roma / Silver fountains and silver obelisks

This sterling silver , placed on the precious Nero Marquinia marble, depicts the philosopher Socrates. The historical period in which Socrates lived is characterized by two fundamental dates: 469 BC. and 404 BC The first date, that of his birth, marks the final victory of the Greeks over the Persians (battle of the Eurimedonte). The second refers to when the golden age of Pericles followed, after 404 with the Spartan victory, the advent of the government of the Thirty Tyrants. Socrates’ life therefore takes place in the period of the greatest Athenian power but also of its decline. Socrates’ father, Sofroniscus, was a sculptor of the demo of Alopece, and it is possible that he passed on this profession to his young son, even if no testimony attributes any profession to him: in this sense, according to Diogenes Laertius, the work of Socrates would have been the Charites, dressed, on the Acropolis of Athens. His mother, Fenarete, who had already had a son named Patrocles from a previous marriage with Cheredemo, would have been a midwife. Probably Socrates was of a wealthy family, of aristocratic origins: in the Platonic dialogues it does not appear that he exercised any job and we know that he fought when he was between 40 and 50 years old as a hoplite in the battle of Potidea, and in those of Delio and of Amphipolis. It is reported in Plato’s Symposium dialogue that Socrates was decorated for his bravery. In one case, it is said, he remained at the side of Alcibiades wounded, probably saving his life. During these war campaigns he proved to be extraordinarily resilient, marching in the winter without shoes or cloak. The death of Socrates is described to us in detail by Plato, who however was not present at the end of the master, in the dialogue of the Phaedo. On the last day of Socrates’ life, Euclid of Megara and Terpsion were instead present with whom he converses in the Teetetus.Socrates serenely spends, according to his habits, his last day in the company of his friends and disciples, talking about philosophy as he always had. done, and in particular by addressing the problem of the immortality of the soul and the fate of man in the afterlife.