Silver earrings with coins depicting Marcus Aurelius and Faustina

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Jewels with coins, Roman intaglios stones and micro-mosaics

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Liste nozze

Silver earrings with coins depicting Marcus Aurelius and Faustina

Categoria:

Jewels with coins, Roman intaglios stones and micro-mosaics

Sottocategoria:

Monetary jewels - Bracelets and earrings

Marchio:

Serra - Roma / Jewelry

Codice:

gm108

In this 24 Kt gilded sterling silver earrings are set two authentic Roman coins , depicting Emperor Marcus Aurelius and his wife, Faustina the Younger. Marcus Aurelius ( 26 April 121 – 17 March 180) was Roman emperor from 161 to 180 and a Stoic philosopher. He was the last of the rulers known as the Five Good Emperors (a term coined some 13 centuries later by Niccolò Machiavelli), and the last emperor of the Pax Romana, an age of relative peace and stability for the Roman Empire. He served as Roman consul in 140, 145, and 161. Marcus was born during the reign of Hadrian to the emperor’s nephew, the praetor Marcus Annius Verus, and the heiress Domitia Lucilla. His father died when he was three, and Marcus was raised by his mother and grandfather. After Hadrian’s adoptive son, Aelius Caesar, died in 138, the emperor adopted Marcus’ uncle Antoninus Pius as his new heir. In turn, Antoninus adopted Marcus and Lucius, the son of Aelius. Hadrian died that year and Antoninus became emperor. Now heir to the throne, Marcus studied Greek and Latin under tutors such as Herodes Atticus and Marcus Cornelius Fronto. He kept in close correspondence with Fronto for many years afterwards. Marcus married Antoninus’ daughter Faustina in 145. After Antoninus died in 161, Marcus acceded to the throne alongside his adoptive brother, who took the name Lucius Verus. Unlike some of his predecessors, Marcus chose not to adopt an heir. His children included Lucilla, who married Lucius, and Commodus, whose succession after Marcus has been a subject of debate among both contemporary and modern historians. The Column and Equestrian Statue of Marcus Aurelius still stand in Rome, where they were erected in celebration of his military victories. Meditations, the writings of “the philosopher” – as contemporary biographers called Marcus, are a significant source of the modern understanding of ancient Stoic philosophy. They have been praised by fellow writers, philosophers, monarchs, and politicians centuries after his death.